During his morning briefing, April 2, 2003, President George W. Bush reviews the progress of the war with members of the War Council. (P28531-23A)
News & Events

National Parks Photography Exhibit

Photography Exhibit Celebrates the Wonder and Majesty of America’s National Parks

“The National Parks - Select Images” runs August 10 – 30, 2016.

The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service with a special exhibit featuring select images taken by American photographer Mark Burns.

National Parks -  Mark_Burns_Headshot_Great_BasinNP_PHOTO_COURTESY_TNPPP

“I chose to photograph this project entirely in black and white,” said Burns. “For me, black and white provided the timeless bridge back to the past century. It’s also the photography medium that I prefer to work in. When I’m in the field, I’m not necessarily trying to capture what I’m looking at, but more what I’m feeling. The black and white medium allows me to best express that.”

Courtesy The National Parks Photographs Project (TNPPP)

“With this exhibit, the Bush Library pays tribute to our country’s magnificent national parks, true American treasures that presidents over the years have helped create, nurture, and expand,” said Emily Robison, acting director of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. “Since Abraham Lincoln first signed the bill protecting Yosemite in 1864, Presidents and Congress have been integral in the creation of our system of national parks.”

On August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill creating the National Park Service, an agency charged with preserving and protecting natural and cultural resources in the U.S. for this and future generations. Today, the National Park Service manages 84 million acres including Denali, the highest point in North America, in Denali National Park; the longest cave system known to the world, Mammoth Cave National Park, with more than 400 mapped miles of caves; America’s deepest lake, Crater Lake in Crater Lake National Park, at 1,943 feet; and the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere, Badwater Basin in Death Valley National Park, at 282 feet below sea level.

The “National Parks - Select Images” exhibit celebrates the important role that the visual image has played in the history and creation of America’s national parks. The breathtaking photographs were taken by Burns from 2011 through 2015. A portion of this exhibit also pays tribute to early painters and photographers, whose work helped lead to the protection of many of these special places.

“I chose to photograph this project entirely in black and white,” said Burns. “For me, black and white provided the timeless bridge back to the past century. It’s also the photography medium that I prefer to work in. When I’m in the field, I’m not necessarily trying to capture what I’m looking at, but more what I’m feeling. The black and white medium allows me to best express that.”

Mrs. Laura Bush has long been a champion of America’s national parks, and earlier this year published Our Great Big Backyard, a children’s book about the national parks, penned with daughter Jenna Bush Hager.

“Don’t let the month go by before stopping at the Bush Center to see the photo exhibit of our National Parks, America’s best idea,” urged Mrs. Bush. “This year marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and we are celebrating with this terrific show.”

This photography exhibit will only be on display August 10 through August 30, 2016 at the Bush Library and Museum.

# # #

PDF files require the free Adobe Reader.

  • Print Print